You can’t blame a dog for trying. After all, who isn’t tempted by the smells, sights, and sounds of pancakes being made? 
 
That was the case for a Golden Retriever in Southwick, Massachusetts, who jumped up to steal some pancakes off the stove in the kitchen at his home. But, as the hungry pup went for his treat, he accidentally hit the ignition button on the gas stove, prompting one of the burners to turn on and filling the kitchen with smoke. 
 
The moment was all caught on security tape by the owners, who, according to the Southwick Fire Department, were “connected to a monitored alarm system calling responders, saving severe damage.” 
 
While the incident could have been much worse, it was a reminder from the fire department for pet parents to avoid keeping items on the stove and to consider putting safety covers on stove controls. 
 
It’s not only gas stoves that can cause fires in homes that have pets, warned Dr. Jerry Klein, the chief veterinary officer for the American Kennel Club. “Both electric and gas stoves present problems for pets,” he said. “Electric stovetops stay hot even after they are turned off.”
 
“Pets can easily burn their paws by touching electric stovetops before they are fully cooled,” Klein said. “Gas ranges can be turned on by curious pets jumping up to explore smells. This can lead to burns for the pet, or even start a fire.”
 
Echoing the statement from the fire department, Klein urged pet parents not to leave items on or near the stove, including any flammable materials. Pet parents should train and discourage their dogs from going near the stove in the kitchen to prevent possible fires and other accidents from occurring, he said. 
 
Even if your dog is trained to not jump up in the kitchen or reach for off-limit food items, Klein said, “it’s always best to make sure you have working smoke alarms in the house to alert you, should a pet start a fire when you are not looking.” 
 
Image via Shutterstock 
 
Read more: 5 Dangers of Smoke Inhalation for Pets
 

Source: Pet MD