Image via iStock.com/mustafagull
 
On September 10, 2018, Unilever issued a press release announcing that they are supporting efforts to institute a global ban on animal testing. According to the statement, “Unilever today announced its support for a global ban on animal testing for cosmetics as part of an ambitious new collaboration with animal protection leader Humane Society International (HSI).”
 
Animal testing for cosmetics has actually been banned since 2013 in the EU. Unilever is hoping that by supporting HSI’s #BeCrueltyFree initiative, they can help to encourage other countries to adopt a similar ban.
 
To further demonstrate their commitment to the cruelty-free cause, they also announced that their beauty and personal care brand, Dove, will be 100 percent cruelty-free moving forward.
 
On October 9, 2018, PETA published a blog article announcing that Dove has earned their “Cruelty-Free Stamp of Approval.” They explain, “Unilever is taking a stance on products tested on animals, and consumers will approve. First, Dove—one of the most widely recognized and conveniently available personal care product brands in the world—has banned all tests on animals anywhere in the world and has just been added to PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies cruelty-free list!”
 
Starting in 2019, the Dove products will also have PETA’s cruelty-free bunny logo on all their packaging.
 
PETA hopes that Unilever’s efforts will inspire other companies and reminds the public, “Always make sure that the products you buy are from the more than 3,500 cruelty-free companies that are included in PETA’s Beauty Without Bunnies searchable global database of companies that don’t test on animals.”
 
 
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Source: Pet MD